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Archive for the ‘Literature’ Category

Plot: At mid-thirties, Elizabeth Gilbert seeems to have everything that a woman can ever desire: a successful carrer, a loving husband, a beautiful house and wonderful charm and beauty. However, she is not happy with her life. Suffering depression from a recent nasty divorce and disastrous relationship, Liz decides to travel abroad to Italy, India and Indonesia for a year. The memoir is divided into three sections based on the three country she visited. In Italy, she found all the possible worldly pleasure and expressions of beauty with its rich culture of arts, philosophy, languages and cuisine. In India, she found the true expression of happiness and a spiritual relationship with God. In Bali of Indonesia, she finds a balance between enjoying worldly pleasures and spiritual serenity. Through this year of travel, she is able to rediscover and refine her identity.

Why read? With its exotic description of each country and the author’s intriguing experiences, it is hard to believe that it is a non-fiction work. The explicit description of different cultures are very alluring and interesting. Besides, the author also talks about her change of feelings as she learn about how to deal with her life’s ups an downs, which makes you want to laugh and cry with her.

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Эта удивительно добрая книга не делает ошеломляющих заявлений. Автор просто предполагает, что маленькие дети обладают способностью научиться чему угодно. Он считает, что то, что они усваивают без каких-либо усилий в 2, 3 или 4 года, в дальнейшем дается им с трудом или вообще не дается. По его мнению, то, что взрослые осваивают с трудом, дети выучивают играючи. То, что взрослые усваивают со скоростью улитки, детям дается почти мгновенно. Он говорит, что взрослые иногда ленятся учиться тогда как дети готовы учиться всегда. И утверждает он это ненавязчиво и тактично. Его книга проста, прямолинейна и кристально ясна.

По мнению автора, одним из самых сложных занятий для человека является изучение иностранных языков, обучение чтению и игре на скрипке или фортепьяно. Такими навыками взрослые овладевают с трудом, а для детей – это почти неосознанное усилие.

Масару Ибука предлагает изменить не содержание, а способ обучения ребенка.

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From the Publisher

No religion in the modern world is as feared and misunderstood as Islam. It haunts the popular Western imagination as an extreme faith that promotes authoritarian government, female oppression, civil war, and terrorism. Karen Armstrong’s short history offers a vital corrective to this narrow view. The distillation of years of thinking and writing about Islam, it demonstrates that the world’s fastest-growing faith is a much richer and more complex phenomenon than its modern fundamentalist strain might suggest.

Islam: A Short History begins with the flight of Muhammad and his family from Medina in the seventh century and the subsequent founding of the first mosques. It recounts the origins of the split between Shii and Sunni Muslims, and the emergence of Sufi mysticism; the spread of Islam throughout North Africa, the Levant, and Asia; the shattering effect on the Muslim world of the Crusades; the flowering of imperial Islam in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries into the world’s greatest and most sophisticated power; and the origins and impact of revolutionary Islam. It concludes with an assessment of Islam today and its challenges.

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This three-part series covers more than a thousand years of Islamic history and culture, with emphasis on the contributions that Muslims have made in science, medicine, art, philosophy, learning, and trade.

The first one-hour segment (“The Messenger”) introduces the story of the rise of Islam, and the extraordinary life of the Prophet Muhammad. It covers the revelation of the Qur’an, the persecution suffered by the early Muslims, the first mosques, and then the rapid expansion of Islam.

The second segment (“The Awakening”) examines the growth of Islam into a world civilization. Through trade and learning, the Islamic influence extended further. Muslims made great achievements in architecture, medicine, and science, influencing the intellectual development of the West. This episode also explores the story of the Crusades (including stunning reenactments filmed in Iran), and ends with the invasion of Islamic lands by the Mongols.

The final segment (“The Ottomans”) looks at the dramatic rise and fall of the Ottoman empire.

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Johann Heinrich Friedrich Karl Witte (born July 1, 1800 in Lochau; died March 6, 1883 in Halle) was a German jurist and Dante Alighieri scholar. He was the son of a pastor who encouraged a fairly intense program of learning. His father believed that the intelligence of children is not hereditary, but results from education which should begin between birth and the age of 6. So he began the education of his son when he was a few months old. He taught him reading and writing. Little Karl Witte could read and write German and Latin at age 6. Later, he learned French. Within less than one year, he could read easy French books. After that he learned Greek. He could read Greek books within less than 6 months. By the time he was 8 years old he had learned many languages: German, Latin, French, Italian, English and Greek. He studied at Leipzig University at age 10, got his Doctorate of philosophy degree at age 12, and got a doctorate degree in law at age 16, and became a professor at Berlin University

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Gulim, mehr ko’zda degani yolg’on,
Mening dilimda hech o’chmas yolqinsiz,
Qancha ko’rishmasak shuncha qadrdon,
Qancha olis bo’lsak shuncha yaqinsiz.

Devona oshiqman, men bir devona,
Ayting, sizdan bo’lak kimim bor yana?..
Siz yo’q chog’imdagi dunyom begona,
Siz yo’q bog’imdagi gullar yoqimsiz.

Siz achchiq qismatim, siz iztirobim,
Siz shirin dardimsiz, shirin azobim,
Siz mening ko’klardan topgan oftobim,
Yerlarda yo’qotgan ko’zmunchog’imsiz.

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