Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for September 28th, 2007

High levels of a male sex hormone in foetuses are linked to a higher chance of developing autistic traits in childhood, scientists say.

The findings come from an eight-year study relating the development of 253 children to levels of testosterone they were exposed to in the womb.

The scientists said it was unclear whether the hormone was causing the traits or was a by-product of them.

The research was presented at the BA Festival of Science in York.

The research team, from the University of Cambridge, looked at levels of foetal testosterone in the womb by examining samples taken from women undergoing amniocentesis for clinical reasons.

The children were then followed during their development.

At 12 months, 18 months and 46 months, the scientists used tests to spot autism-like traits, such as counting how often a child looked at its mother’s face or how large its vocabulary was.

At these early stages, the team found a link between the traits and higher foetal testosterone levels.

But the scientists’ latest research results came from a study undertaken when the children were eight years old.

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »